Review / 1000mods – Youth Of Dissent

A growing movement of young activists fighting against the unjust status quo has led to a reputation of millennials and Gen Z as entitled and whiny. The latest record from Greece’s biggest rock band 1000mods seems to turn this reputation on its head and embrace the connotations though, for is dissent not valid in a world as divided as this? Youth Of Dissent is an album that encourages progression, and thus inspires hope.

Suitably, therefore, despite the band having one foot firmly in the stoner rock camp, this is not a laid-back record. Youth Of Dissent is a dynamic affair, always bursting with vivacious energy whether it comes in the form of the arena-ready adrenaline of ‘Warped’ and ‘Pearl’, the grungy power of ‘So Many Days’ and ‘Blister’ or desert rock romps like ‘Lucid’ and ‘Dissent’. There’s psychedelic flourishes to the more expansive spaces of ‘Dear Herculine’ and ‘21st Space Century’ – tracks which entice you in before the band’s ridiculous knack for an addictive riff can do the dirty work. 

Youth Of Dissent’s eleven tracks are staggered in such a way that the record’s 55 minutes breeze past – it feels lively throughout, never lingering on one method of attack for too long. Not that it is all attack, though. The record’s longest number is ‘Young’, which dials back the intensity and offers something more lush and poignant for its opening minutes before gradually unfurling into something grander. Alongside the masterful guitarwork and reverb-soaked vocals of closer ‘Mirrors’, it is amongst the band’s most progressive work to date, and is a staggering display of their potential.

In the realm of rock that potential is seemingly limitless, though Youth Of Dissent may suffer from being released the same day as standout records from the likes of Elder and Elephant Tree. Give it the time it deserves, though, and it’s easy to see that it merits being considered on par as such records.

Youth Of Dissent is out now on Ouga Booga And The Mighty Oug Recordings. Order here.

Words: George Parr